Freakonomics: The Hidden Side of Everything

If the thought of a book on economics is about as exciting as watching your toenails grow, or you are under-whelmed with static and number crunching theory, then the best selling book Freakonomics: A rogue Economist explore The Hidden Side of Everything just might be the look to make you wake up without that extra cup of starbucks’ best.

[amazon_image id=”0060731338″ link=”true” target=”_blank” size=”medium” ]Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything (P.S.)[/amazon_image]
Actually, Freaksonomics is an engaging read because it seems to be more about sociology and psychology than boring numerical analysis. With its well-placed and easy reading style, this book shows how the resulting correlation and causality of data impact our lives and definitely make us think differently about facts and figure. In effect, there are real tangible benefit in thinking laterally. To be sure, their seemingly off-the-wall comparisons are definitely attention grabber.

Who would have ever thought to make the unlikely comparison of teachers and sumo wrestlers to show that economics is, in essence, the study of incentives. But for those of you who desire a smooth flowing book, with multiple concepts building to an ultimate conclusion, you might be disappointed.

Actually, the book presents six wholly different topics, with no unifying theme. And while Freakonomics does jump seemingly randomly from question to question, there are some lessons to be learned. For example, the look demonstrated that the most obvious reason why something happens is not always the real reason.

To be sure, sometimes the real season doesn’t even make the list of possibilities. Or, as is often true in the case studies given in Freakonomics, the cause turns out not to be the cause at all, but the effect. In Freakonomics, while not as controversial, are equally interesting. In fact, some could be considered amusing.

If you are looking to spruce up you intellect for the next cocktail party, ,or widen your eyes to the world around you, the this book is a necessary read. However, what might be considered a turnoff by some is the annoying insertion of quotations from external sources about how innovative or creative the authors are as a precursor to every chapter.

That being said, it is refreshing to have an odd economist, or at least an economist who ask odd questions to tease out the most fascinating facts concerning the mystery of the world around us.

You also able to see All Author of Stephen D. Levvit & Stephen J. Dubner books as follows:

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Product and Price
Super Freakonomics: Global Cooling, Patriotic Prostitutes, and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance
Detail Information Please come to :[amazon_link id=”0060889578″ target=”_blank” ]Super Freakonomics: Global Cooling, Patriotic Prostitutes, and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance[/amazon_link]
[amazon_image id=”0060889578″ link=”true” target=”_blank” size=”medium” ]Super Freakonomics: Global Cooling, Patriotic Prostitutes, and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance[/amazon_image]
Numbers Rule Your World: The Hidden Influence of Probabilities and Statistics on Everything You Do
Detail Information Please come to :[amazon_link id=”0071626530″ target=”_blank” ]Numbers Rule Your World: The Hidden Influence of Probabilities and Statistics on Everything You Do[/amazon_link]
[amazon_image id=”0071626530″ link=”true” target=”_blank” size=”medium” ]Numbers Rule Your World: The Hidden Influence of Probabilities and Statistics on Everything You Do[/amazon_image]

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